Freddie Gray Arrest Record, Criminal History & Rap Sheet

Freddie Gray, martyr or simple criminal?  The man who died after injuries sustained while in Baltimore police custody, indeed had a lengthy criminal history involving many drug related activities, according to Maryland state records.  The officers involved in this case also state that he was dealing the night he was arrested.

Gray, a 25 year-old African-American male, died in custody after spending seven days in a coma, from the injuries he sustained during his arrest and subsequent incarceration.

Gray was arrested on April 12th, by four Baltimore police officers, outside of a public housing project called Gilmor Homes, near the Fulton Ave. subway station. The police report states that four bicycle officers attempted to stop Gray for an unspecified reason, and he ran.  They caught and detained him until transport arrived.

The specifics regarding Gray’s death are not completely known yet, but the family states that his “windpipe was crushed and his neck was snapped”.  Regardless of who was at fault in this incident, his death has sparked a volatile attitude in the city of Baltimore as the torch of protest turns violent.

One of Gray’s friends per the Baltimore Sun, was quoted as saying; “he ran from the police, because he had a history with police beating him.”

Does Gray’s arrest record (listed below) preclude him from fair treatment from authorities?  One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, is holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty; but what happens when you flee police officers?  What happens when you resist arrest?  Maybe this man had been tagged a “bad seed” by Baltimore police officers, but with his proven track record, there is no doubt he deserved the tag.  Maybe he was jaded by the treatment he had received in the past at their hands, but all of this does not equate to “continued criminal activity, fleeing and resisting arrest.

I am most certain the Baltimore Police Department, with the assistance of the Department of Justice will get to the bottom of this now “infamous” investigation and set the record straight as they did in Ferguson.  My only hope is that people might learn one thing from these incidents;  The man with the gun and the badge (no matter how corrupt you think he/she may be) still has the “gun and the badge”.  As the theme from that 70s tv show says; “Don’t do the crime, if you can’t do the time.”

  • March 20, 2015: Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance
  • March 13, 2015: Malicious destruction of property, second-degree assault
  • January 20, 2015: Fourth-degree burglary, trespassing
  • January 14, 2015: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute
  • December 31, 2014: Possession of narcotics with intent to distribute
  • December 14, 2014: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • August 31, 2014: Illegal gambling, trespassing
  • January 25, 2014: Possession of marijuana
  • September 28, 2013: Distribution of narcotics, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, second-degree assault, second-degree escape
  • April 13, 2012: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, violation of probation
  • July 16, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession with intent to distribute
  • March 28, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • March 14, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to manufacture and distribute
  • February 11, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • August 29, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, violation of probation
  • August 28, 2007: Possession of marijuana
  • August 23, 2007: False statement to a peace officer, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
  • July 16, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance (2 counts)  *Maryland Department of Justice

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Patrick James
Patrick James has worked as a firefighter/EMT for several services throughout the years, as well as a custom metal fabricator, certified personal trainer and chef.

Growing up in the rural suburbs of Detroit, it was during his frequent trips to Northern Michigan where he learned of his love for hunting and fishing. Spending several of his adult years in upstate South Carolina, his love of extreme sports took root in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains as he learned to rock climb and kayak.

“Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and vanish into air.” ~ John Quincy Adams

About the Author

Patrick James
Patrick James
Patrick James has worked as a firefighter/EMT for several services throughout the years, as well as a custom metal fabricator, certified personal trainer and chef. Growing up in the rural suburbs of Detroit, it was during his frequent trips to Northern Michigan where he learned of his love for hunting and fishing. Spending several of his adult years in upstate South Carolina, his love of extreme sports took root in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains as he learned to rock climb and kayak. "Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and vanish into air." ~ John Quincy Adams

8 Comments on "Freddie Gray Arrest Record, Criminal History & Rap Sheet"

  1. By your contorted, twisted and vague logic, Freddie Gray deserved to die for his rap sheet. Except that isn’t the way a free and just society is supposed to work. Shame on you for not calling out a police system that has protocols and is organized to defend and protect the use of extreme force resulting in the death of too many citizens. The fact that people have a rap sheet and continue to engage in criminal activity in no way justifies their premature deaths brought upon them by the hands of the police.

  2. The problem, to me, is obvious. Our legal system was absolutely at fault here. This simonized turd should have been in prison. Had the judicial and penal system treated him like he should have been treated, the little bastard would be languishing in a cell somewhere instead of takin’ up good space in the ground.
    And Baltimore was torn to hell over THIS???

  3. Hey Mike, maybe you missed the part in the article where I said; Does Gray’s arrest record (listed below) preclude him from fair treatment from authorities? One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, is holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty.

    I think you should read an entire article before you start slinging accusations about someone’s integrity. It doesn’t speak well of your intelligence… The fact is, both sides are “innocent” until guilt is proved. I’m most certain their formal investigation will reveal the guilty party as it did in Ferguson. As far as you speaking out against the Police officers involved, shame on you… You were NOT there, and have no clue what happened that night. Sorry for your luck, but you score negative points with that comment.

  4. TAMMY HOSFIELD | April 30, 2015 at 5:07 am |

    IF HE WOULD HAVE IN MONTANA HE WOULD HAVE BEEN IN PRISON FOR THE REST OF HIS LIFE BECAUSE WE HAVE WHAT THEY CALL THREE STRIKE YOU ARE PUT IN PRISON AS AN CHRONIC OFFENDER AND THAT CARRYS ABOUT 60+ YEARS THERE WOULD BE NO CHANCE TO GETTING OUT.THIS BULL WITH THAT MANY DRUG CHARGES AND WE NO LONGER HAVE EARLY RELEASE BECAUSE OF GOOD BEHAVIOR. YOU GET TO SERVE TILL YOU ARE IN YOU 80’s. I THINK THAT PEOPLE WHO WONT LEARN A LESSON SHOULD HAVE NEVER GIVEN ANOTHER CHANCE TO BE A DRUG DEALER AGAIN. AND FROM WHAT WAS SAID ABOUT WHAT HAS HAPPENED THERE WAS ANOTHER PRISONER IN THE VAN WITH GREY AND FROM WHAT THAT GUY SAID WAS THAT GREY WAS HITTING HIS HEAD AND FLINGING HIMSELF AROUND AND THE WAY IT SOUND WAS GREY WAS TRYING TO HURT HIS SELF TO CLAIM POLICE BRUTALITY AND TO MAYBE MAKE SOME MONEY OFF THE CITY AND THINK ABOUT IT THE BULL GREY PULLED HE WANTED TO MAKE THE CITY COPS LOOK BAD AND TO CLAIM THAT IT WAS A RACIAL MOTIVATED TO CLAIM WHITE COPS AGAINST A BLACK MAN. IT REALLY SOUNDS FISHY TO ME AND I REALLY THINK THAT THIS WAS SOMETHING THAT GREY DID TO HIM SELF AND HE FLUNG HIS BODY ALL OVER THE PLACE AND IF HE WAS NOT INA SEAT BELT THEY WAY HE WAS FLING AROUND IF HE JUMPED UP AND HIT WRONG OR FELL THE WRONG WAY THEN HE SNAPPED HIS OWN NECK.SO IT WAS NOT POLICE BRUTALITY IT WAS A CRIMINAL WHO WANTED TO BUST HIS SELF UP TO BLAME THE COPS AND GET SOME MONEY.

  5. He was working for officers he didn’t do too much time cause he was a snitch. Regardless his life is gone,that’s not changing ya I’m sure he crushed his own wind pipe and broke his own neck geez all the sheep seem to have an opinion on this one .Anyway it’ll just be someone else somewhere down the road getting beat and killed cause they investigated themselves and cleared themselves of all wrong doing.Another sub-class citizen gone no biggie (what most of America is saying) (convicted felon)

  6. The sad thing is that we do not see what happened before someone starts taping. We do not know what started this and if they (police) had knowledge of his past arrests then knowing that he has been violent they had every right to use more force. The saddest thing is that African Americans are making these as a “black thing” when it is not. Why can’t someone when caught committing a crime just say you caught me I did it? Instead they use the race card when white officers arrest a black man. When what I have seen lately they are the ones being prejudice. Don’t do the crime if you can’t handle the results of your actions, and stop making it about race.

  7. Gene Burkholder | May 1, 2015 at 10:46 am |

    Well, now that the officers are charged with homicide, what do you guys have to say about all your presumptuous and racists rants?

  8. A lot of conclusion-jumping here.

    So the guy has a fairly extensive arrest record. The question is, how many of these arrests resulted in a CONVICTION?

    The argument that black people have is the fact that police DO tend to arrest a black person more often than they would arrest a white one in the same circumstance. Often, the charges are never formally charged, and the arrestee is usually released from jail after a week or so.

    For people who have never lived in these kinds of situations, the idea that this is even happening is hard to believe.

    But it is, and the people it is happening to are finally saying that they have had enough.

    Today we’ve learned that all of the speculation and supposition found here and at other websites was wrong. Freddie Gray did NOT break his own vertebrae or sever his own spinal cord. In fact, he hadn’t done anything wrong that would have warranted him being stopped, let alone arrested and detained. Yet he was, and he died for it.

    We learned that he ran because he didn’t want to be subjected to being tossed in jail and mistreated for no reason. Given some of the other cases of deaths at the hands of the police lately, could you blame him?

    But we have also learned that the system DOES work sometimes — if you at least give it the chance to. I’m not saying that people don’t have a right to protest — they most certainly have that right. It’s just that they really should have given the system enough time to thoroughly investigate and examine the facts before jumping off. At least have something concrete to protest.

    I find it ironic that the very thing that protesters complain about — arresting and detaining someone for no proof of wrongdoing, is something that they expected the authorities to do with the cops in this case. This is a two-way street. Investigations take time. Hell, a proper autopsy takes at LEAST three weeks. This isn’t a television series where everything is wrapped up with a nice little bow in 42 minutes.

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