Flag Day – A Brief History Of The Evolution Of The American Flag

Current American Flag (Image Source: google images)

In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14 and commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States. The adoption of an official American flag happened on that day in 1777 by resolution of the Second Continental Congress. The United States Army also celebrates the Army Birthday on this date; Congress adopted “the American continental army” after reaching a consensus position in the Committee of the Whole on June 14, 1775.

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day and in August 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress.

The American flag has gone through quite an evolution over the last 238 years. Here is just a brief look at that history and evolution:

(Image Source: google images)

(Image Source: google images)

American ships in New England waters flew a “Liberty Tree” flag in 1775. It shows a green pine tree on a white background, with the words, “An Appeal to Heaven.” “Liberty Tree” is often associated with the Thomas Jefferson quote “the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants.” The first documented source of the quote was 12 years later in 1787. However, the idea behind the quote is thought by some to have been the inspiration for the flag as well.

 

(Image Source: google images)

(Image Source: google images)

In 1775, the Continental Navy flew a very different flag. It was the now familiar 13 red/white stripes, a rattlesnake and the warning, “Don’t Tread on Me,” upon its inception.

 

 

 

 

gadsden

Gadsden Flag designed by Christopher Gadsden in 1775. (Image Source: google images)

The coiled rattlesnake and “Don’t Tread on Me” phrase was also used with a yellow background on what is known as the Gadsden Flag. Used by the Continental Marines at the time, the Gadsden flag is also a popular choice of the modern day Liberty movements in America. From the Tea Party to Gun Rights advocates, the “Don’t Tread on Me” phrase has become popular as a warning to big government and governmental abuses of power.

 

 

Betsy Ross Presenting the Old Glory, painted by Walter Haskell Hinton in 1950 (Image Source: google images)

Betsy Ross Presenting the Old Glory, painted by Walter Haskell Hinton in 1950
(Image Source: google images)

However, the well known story of the Betsy Ross flag, “Old Glory” was the design officially adopted on June 14, 1777 and has become the standard design with the 13 alternating red and white stripe, and blue field with white stars in the upper left corner. The scene depicted in the painting by Walter Haskel Hinton is set at some point in May or June 1776, just prior to the nation’s Declaration of Independence on July 4. The three gentlemen pictured, from left to right, are General George Washington, commander of the American Continental Army, with Colonel George Ross (center), the uncle of Betsy’s first (deceased) husband, John Ross, and Robert Morris, known as the “Financier” of the American Revolution, both of whom would sign the Declaration.

This Confederate flag, which was captured at the Battle of Mine Creek, Kans., Oct. 24, 1864, sold at auction June 25, 2011, for $26,290. Heritage Auction Galleries (Dallas) sold the 35-by-50-inch wool flag accompanied by documentation and historical analysis. (Photo courtesy Heritage Auction Galleries)

This Confederate flag, which was captured at the Battle of Mine Creek, Kans., Oct. 24, 1864, sold at auction June 25, 2011, for $26,290. Heritage Auction Galleries (Dallas) sold the 35-by-50-inch wool flag accompanied by documentation and historical analysis.
(Photo courtesy Heritage Auction Galleries)

The newly adopted official American flag did not gain widespread acceptance until after the Civil War and even to this day, some Southerners still refer to it as the “flag of northern aggression.” That being said, during the Civil War a large part of the United States flew a very different flag, multiple flags in fact. The most recognizable of them today is the Confederate Battle Flag, also known as the Southern Cross. Although the Civil War happened 150 years ago, the Confederate flag is still a divisive symbol in America, inspiring a sense of heritage in some and a reminder of slavery to others. Love it or hate it, it was a symbol of part of our nation for a time, a turbulent time and a time we should never forget or repeat.

 

 

Current American Flag (Image Source: google images)

Current American Flag
(Image Source: google images)

Since then, the American flag has only changed with the addition of each new state resulting in the addition of a star to the blue field. When a state is added to the Union, a new flag with the undated star count and design is adopted the following July 4th as the new official American flag. Alaska became the 49th state on January 3, 1959 and Hawaii became the 50th state on August 21, 1959, so the flag we know today as the American flag became official July 4, 1960.

While the United States does still have territories, like Puerto Rico, there are no current plans to add a 51st state. Although, if the United States did add a 51st state, this is a proposed 51 star flag that could become the American standard on on the July 4th following the admission of that 51st state to the union.

51-star flags have been designed and used as a symbol by supporters of statehood in various areas. This is an example of how a 51-star flag might look. (Image Source: wikipedia)

51-star flags have been designed and used as a symbol by supporters of statehood in various areas. This is an example of how a 51-star flag might look.
(Image Source: wikipedia)

Joining the U.S. Air Force right out of high school, Jon had the opportunity to experience many different parts of the world and different cultures. His post military career path, both white collar and blue collar, allowed him to work alongside both CEOs and average Joes. “Writing was never a goal or even vaguely contemplated as a career choice, it just happened, an accidental discovery of a talent and a passion.” A passion that has taken him in many directions from explorations of the zombie subculture and writing zombie stories to politics and News. He is an avid “people watcher,” political junkie and has a ravenous appetite for history and current events alike.

About the Author

Jon Britton
Joining the U.S. Air Force right out of high school, Jon had the opportunity to experience many different parts of the world and different cultures. His post military career path, both white collar and blue collar, allowed him to work alongside both CEOs and average Joes. "Writing was never a goal or even vaguely contemplated as a career choice, it just happened, an accidental discovery of a talent and a passion." A passion that has taken him in many directions from explorations of the zombie subculture and writing zombie stories to politics and News. He is an avid "people watcher," political junkie and has a ravenous appetite for history and current events alike.
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